SUPRANAV DASH’S PORTRAITS REFLECTS THE RESILLIENCE OF INDIA’S LGBTQI+ COMMUNITY

SUPRANAV DASH’S PORTRAITS REFLECTS THE RESILLIENCE OF INDIA’S LGBTQI+ COMMUNITY

DENIZ AKKAYA

Based between Kolkata and New York, Supranav Dash is a photographer who explores the identities and experiences of LGBTQ+ individuals living in India…

Eros And Its Discontents explores the lives and desires of individuals from the LGBTQI+ community living in India. These photos see struggles of identity, hopes and dreams, pleasure, pains and rejections. The people in my images are treading a psychological minefield. Working with these people I find so much solace in the written works of Plato, Freud and Jung. These fields are crisscrossed with complexities that arise out of a religious, conservative, and homophobic Indian culture that is quick to marginalize and discriminate. The photographs of this body of work are witness to this subjugated community; they document the crest and trough of these lives.

LGBTQ Studio Kolkata
Kolkata Studio photography 2019

“Eros And Its Discontents explores the lives and desires of individuals in India’s LGBTQIA+ community. These photos see struggles of identity, hopes and dreams, pleasure, pain, and rejection. The people in my images are treading a psychological minefield, and while undertaking this project, I’ve found much solace in the written works of Plato, Freud, and Jung. These fields are crisscrossed with complexities that arise out of a religious, conservative, and homophobic Indian culture that is quick to marginalize and discriminate. The project is witness to this subjugated community; they document the crest and trough of these lives… My intention with ‘Eros And Its Discontents’ is to portray the stories of struggles of my close circle and friends alike, celebrating their lives and subverting societal challenges through visibility, inclusivity, and empowerment.” Says Dash in an interview about his Project.

Kolkata Studio photography 2019
Kolkata Studio photography 2019
Kolkata Studio photography 2019

A PHOTOGRAPHIC LOVE LETTER: I’D LIKE TO GET TO KNOW YOU

A PHOTOGRAPHIC LOVE LETTER: I’D LIKE TO GET TO KNOW YOU

DENIZ AKKAYA

Shot over five summer months in rural Devon, I’d like to get to know you is an intimate document of her relationship with her sister, Alida…

Set during a summer in rural Devon, I’d like to get to know you is an exploration of the tentative foray into a new relationship. Francesca turns her gaze curiously on her younger sister Alida, but not without hesitation. Growing up, the traditional sibling bond has felt elusive. The series documents the sisters tiptoeing around each other with a palpable tension, a push and a pull, opening up and later holding back; relationships are not linear.

The resulting body of work paints a vivid and sun-soaked picture of a complex yet flourishing relationship with changing dynamics, not only in how Francesca sees Alida, but how Alida sees herself.

The photobook includes 42 images shot over five summer months in rural Devon; an exhibition of the same name is currently on show at London’s 10 14 gallery, until 24 April.

“I started photographing Alida when I first picked up a camera – she was kind of who was there,” explains Allen. “I got a digital point and shoot for my birthday – I must have been 14 – and the first pictures on there are of her. They’re these really weird flash pictures, quite experimental with a lot of Photoshop.”

Styling by Claire Lemaigre, Book Design by EYM Studio, Retouch by Hempstead May

ALEX PRAGER, PART ONE: THE MOUNTAIN (2022)

ALEX PRAGER, PART ONE: THE MOUNTAIN (2022)

DENIZ AKKAYA

A solo exhibition of new work by artist Alex Prager featuring elaborately staged scenes that capture a moment frozen in time.

Lehmann Maupin London presents Part One: The Mountain, an exhibition of new work by artist Alex Prager. Both a photographer and filmmaker, Prager is known for her elaborately staged scenes that capture a moment frozen in time, inviting the viewer to “complete the story” and speculate about its narrative context.

Prager cultivates an uncanny, dreamlike mood throughout her oeuvre—an effect heightened by her use of timeless costuming and richly saturated colors that recall technicolor films, as well as the mysterious or inexplicable happenings she often depicts. Her meticulously crafted photographs are filled with hyperreal details, from signatures on the cast of a high school football player or bandage on the nose of a woman running in terror, to the face in the reflection of a handheld mirror or figure revealed to be a cardboard cutout, firmly locating Prager’s images in the real world and belying the sense of the surreal that often pervades her work.

Although Prager’s immersive, large-scale photographs of crowds are among her best-known work the artist’s newest series evinces a return to portraiture, a genre she first explored early in her practice. Rendered on a smaller, more intimate scale that draws the viewer in, Part One: The Mountain features a series of stripped-down Americana portraits that capture the artist’s subjects in the midst of intense inner turmoil. The inspiration for Part One: The Mountain arose from Prager’s deep desire to examine the myriad emotional states we have all experienced during one of the greatest collective upheavals in modern society. Conceived as psychological portraits, these images visualize a private moment that is understood universally.

Prager’s subjects in Part One: The Mountain can be seen as archetypes, an update of sorts to those found in ancient Greek mythology. The series includes Prager’s quintessential characters, placed in a world that teeters between the fabricated and the familiar. Each image in the series occupies ambiguous territory, leaving space for the viewer to interpret each scene and draw their own conclusions about its narrative.

The title of the exhibition, Part One: The Mountain, is highly symbolic, with the idea of the mountain referenced throughout literature, religion, and psychology as a place where personal revelations, or reckonings, can occur. If the idea of summiting a peak has historically suggested a spiritual pilgrimage or intense physical challenge, it should be remembered that traversing mountainous terrain has often symbolized overcoming obstacles or making hard-won progress. If we have found ourselves metaphorically on the mountain over the course of the past two years, Prager’s newest body of work prompts us to imagine what the world will look like when we finally come back down.

The exhibition is supported by WePresent, WeTransfer’s digital arts platform.

On view from 21 January – 5 March, please note that this exhibition is closed on Sundays.

ANDI GÁLDI VINKÓ: THE CREATIVE CRISIS OF MOTHERHOOD

ANDI GÁLDI VINKÓ: THE CREATIVE CRISIS OF MOTHERHOOD

DENIZ AKKAYA

Photographer Andi Gáldi Vinkó beautifully documents her attempts to take “control of the chaos” as both a mother and an artist.

Hungarian photographer Andi Galdi Vinko reflects on motherhood starting from her own personal experiences in her photo series “Sorry I gave birth I disappeared but now I’m back.” Her work combines images of pregnant women – mostly friends – portraits of their partners with their firstborn, exhausted women in the act of breastfeeding, children in their first years and photographs of transforming female bodies. The aim is to show the disruptions caused by the birth of a baby, especially on mother’s life, as realistically as possible. The pain experienced during childbirth is just an indication of what awaits a family, and especially a mother.

About Andi Gáldi Vinkó:

“Since I gave birth, since I have a child, I am not the same person.  Not because I grew up, or think of the meaning of life in a different way, but because there is this tiny human being I somehow ended up loving more than I ever loved before.  More than myself. More than my art. How am I supposed to believe in myself again?  In the meaning of creating? In creating a meaning?   This small selection of this work in progress-series, which eventually will always be a work in progress is about becoming, understanding, and remembering.  Trying not to forget all those things that once seemed so important, and the minute you think you know it another challenge appears.   How can something so universal as motherhood be so lonely.   How can something so universal as motherhood be so lonely.  How come we all have to experience it and there are no answers to all those struggles?  What about our bodies, our hormones, our thoughts, our friends, our loves.  Our careers, our homes, our dishes, our laundries, our sexual desires.  What happened to our freedom, our showers, our sleeping hours?    I love being a mother.  I also loved being an artist,” says about her new series.