SUPRANAV DASH’S PORTRAITS REFLECTS THE RESILLIENCE OF INDIA’S LGBTQI+ COMMUNITY

SUPRANAV DASH’S PORTRAITS REFLECTS THE RESILLIENCE OF INDIA’S LGBTQI+ COMMUNITY

DENIZ AKKAYA

Based between Kolkata and New York, Supranav Dash is a photographer who explores the identities and experiences of LGBTQ+ individuals living in India…

Eros And Its Discontents explores the lives and desires of individuals from the LGBTQI+ community living in India. These photos see struggles of identity, hopes and dreams, pleasure, pains and rejections. The people in my images are treading a psychological minefield. Working with these people I find so much solace in the written works of Plato, Freud and Jung. These fields are crisscrossed with complexities that arise out of a religious, conservative, and homophobic Indian culture that is quick to marginalize and discriminate. The photographs of this body of work are witness to this subjugated community; they document the crest and trough of these lives.

LGBTQ Studio Kolkata
Kolkata Studio photography 2019

“Eros And Its Discontents explores the lives and desires of individuals in India’s LGBTQIA+ community. These photos see struggles of identity, hopes and dreams, pleasure, pain, and rejection. The people in my images are treading a psychological minefield, and while undertaking this project, I’ve found much solace in the written works of Plato, Freud, and Jung. These fields are crisscrossed with complexities that arise out of a religious, conservative, and homophobic Indian culture that is quick to marginalize and discriminate. The project is witness to this subjugated community; they document the crest and trough of these lives… My intention with ‘Eros And Its Discontents’ is to portray the stories of struggles of my close circle and friends alike, celebrating their lives and subverting societal challenges through visibility, inclusivity, and empowerment.” Says Dash in an interview about his Project.

Kolkata Studio photography 2019
Kolkata Studio photography 2019
Kolkata Studio photography 2019

A PHOTOGRAPHIC LOVE LETTER: I’D LIKE TO GET TO KNOW YOU

A PHOTOGRAPHIC LOVE LETTER: I’D LIKE TO GET TO KNOW YOU

DENIZ AKKAYA

Shot over five summer months in rural Devon, I’d like to get to know you is an intimate document of her relationship with her sister, Alida…

Set during a summer in rural Devon, I’d like to get to know you is an exploration of the tentative foray into a new relationship. Francesca turns her gaze curiously on her younger sister Alida, but not without hesitation. Growing up, the traditional sibling bond has felt elusive. The series documents the sisters tiptoeing around each other with a palpable tension, a push and a pull, opening up and later holding back; relationships are not linear.

The resulting body of work paints a vivid and sun-soaked picture of a complex yet flourishing relationship with changing dynamics, not only in how Francesca sees Alida, but how Alida sees herself.

The photobook includes 42 images shot over five summer months in rural Devon; an exhibition of the same name is currently on show at London’s 10 14 gallery, until 24 April.

“I started photographing Alida when I first picked up a camera – she was kind of who was there,” explains Allen. “I got a digital point and shoot for my birthday – I must have been 14 – and the first pictures on there are of her. They’re these really weird flash pictures, quite experimental with a lot of Photoshop.”

Styling by Claire Lemaigre, Book Design by EYM Studio, Retouch by Hempstead May

TOGETHERNESS BY MATTHEW BROOKES

TOGETHERNESS BY MATTHEW BROOKES

DENIZ AKKAYA

Matthew Brookes is pleased to announce his latest exhibition titled Togetherness. With the world thrown into disarray in the wee stages of 2020, human connection has never been more valued than it is today. 

Togetherness is a celebration of life and love in its many forms. Between mothers, brothers, sisters and lovers, this exhibition covers the wide spectrum of relationships in which humanity is ultimately borne. Having moved to Los Angeles by way of Paris in early 2021, Matthew Brookes was struck by the innate beauty and interconnection of the residents of Venice Beach. A spirit long adored by people far and wide, this exhibition brings to light the importance of not only relationship, but environment, and how integrating oneself into a community can lead to the creation of art, friendship, and ultimately: love.

“I really wanted to show love in its many shapes and forms. I think what the world is missing so much is that feeling of connection between their family and loved ones. So many of us have been either separated or lost people close to us since the pandemic started (myself included) and we are all longing for that feeling of personal connection and “togetherness”.

This project started out as a portrait project but what I realized very quickly is how much people wanted to be photographed with people that they loved – the result was quite profound and touching. As I was shooting I would show the subjects their portraits and they were getting very emotional. The session would start by me saying “Give each other a hug.” and we would continue from there. It was almost like a therapy session where people could express their feelings for one another – whether the relationship was family, friendship or lovers, each session got better and better. I was living on the beach so we shot at magic hour as the sun was setting. The atmosphere on the beach was really quiet and beautiful. The whole experience seemed to be healing for everyone involved. We are aiming to raise money for homeless children in Venice Beach so any profits from the exhibition will go to a charity in Venice Beach called SPY (Safe Place for Youth).”

Matthew Brookes likes to find the emotion in his subjects before he photographs them because for him it’s as much about what he feels when they are in front his lens as to what he sees. It’s about scratching below the surface and finding the real person in each portrait he creates, rather than the image the subject might feel they should project.

Brookes’ portraits feature in a wide range of publications -Vanity Fair, Vogue, L’Uomo Vogue, The New York Times’ T Magazine, Interview and British and Spanish Vogue. And he also works closely with a variety of luxury brands Giorgio Armani, Burberry, Cartier, Louis Vuitton, Berluti, David Yurman and Zegna. Born in England, raised in South Africa, it was in Paris that Brookes first discovered his passion for photography. The allure of the city had a profound influence on his aesthetic as a photographer. Aside from working with celebrities and models Brookes also enjoys photographing sports men and women and dancers as he is fascinated in the human form and movement. In 2015 he published “Les Danseurs”, a series of photographs of the ballet dancers of the Paris Opera. He divides his time between Paris and New York.

DAVE BENETT’S LEGENDARY PHOTOS GO ON A NEW EXHIBITON IN LONDON

DAVE BENETT’S LEGENDARY PHOTOS GO ON A NEW EXHIBITON IN LONDON

DENIZ AKKAYA

Celebrating 40 years of fashion, fun and fabulousness…

In the Nineties, there was one photographer, Dave Benett, who was always in the right place, at the right time. He’s shot everyone from Paris Hilton at her 21st birthday to Liz Hurley in the infamous Versace safety pin dress on the arm of Hugh Grant. His friendly face has been on London’s societal party scene since the 1980s and has gained the utmost trust of supermodels, A-list actors and the Royal Family during his 40-year career.

To celebrate this milestone anniversary, Benett is set to open an exhibition of his works at JD Malat Gallery in Mayfair, choosing his favourite moments out of over 1 million images in his archive. In his own words the space will be filled with, ‘pictures that are very familiar to people and in the back of their minds, have wondered who took them’. 

JD Malat Gallery is pleased to present Great Shot, Kid, a solo exhibition by cult British photographer Dave Benett. Co-curated by Dylan Jones, the exhibition will be on display from 17 February until 8 March 2022.

PRADA AOYAMA: ROLE PLAY

PRADA AOYAMA: ROLE PLAY

DENIZ AKKAYA

Prada presents “Role Play”, an exhibition project organized with the support of Fondazione Prada and curated by Melissa Harris, exploring notions of the search, projection, and invention of possible alternative and idealized identities.

The fifth floor of the iconic building designed by Herzog & de Meuron hosts a second version of the show on view at Osservatorio Fondazione Prada in Milan (on view from 19 February to 27 June 2022) including photographic, video and audio works by international artists Juno Calypso, Beatrice Marchi, Haruka Sakaguchi and Griselda San Martin, Tomoko Sawada, and Bogosi Sekhukhuni, in a light installation project conceived by the creative agency Random Studio.

Role-playing, the creation of alter-egos, and the proliferation of self are possible strategies that the artists in the exhibition employ to investigate and understand each individual’s essence and persona. As Melissa Harris points out, “An alter ego, persona, or avatar may be aspirational; it may relate to one’s personal and cultural history and sense of otherness; it may be a form of activism, or a means of maneuvering through entrenched, even polarized positions, toward empathy: putting oneself in another’s shoes”.

The exhibit also features Juno Calypso’s eerie performance piece about femininity. The photographer posed as a travel writer and landed in an underground mansion in Vegas. Calypso is a multimedia artist that began taking pictures of herself as her alter ego, Joyce, while studying photography. She disguised herself in real life by posing as a travel writer, which gave her access to stunning locations like a mansion built underneath Las Vegas in the ’70s. Her piece, A Clone of Your Own, was created as a self-portrait of Joyce, modeled as a performance piece about femininity.

View the full “Role Play” exhibit from March 11 to June 20 at Prada Aoyama Tokyo.


PRADA AOYAMA
5-2-6 Minami Aoyama, Minato-ku, Tokyo

EXHIBITION HOURS
Monday to Sunday: 11am – 8pm

DAVID BOWIE’S THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH IS BECOMING A NEW GRAPHIC NOVEL

DAVID BOWIE’S THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH IS BECOMING A NEW GRAPHIC NOVEL

DENIZ AKKAYA

The Man Who Fell to Earth was David Bowie’s first acting role and now this unforgettable film finds new life in a stunning graphic novel adaptation.

“The Man Who Fell To Earth” is legendary British director Nicolas Roeg’s classic 1976 alien encounter film starring rock megastar David Bowie, and to this day it stands as a milestone achievement in sci-fi filmmaking. 

Photo by Studiocanal/Shutterstock

Like the film before it, Titan’s The Man Who Fell to Earth will tell the story of Thomas Jerome Newton, a humanoid alien with Bowie’s signature heterochromatic eyes who comes to Earth on a desperate mission in search of water that his home planet desperately needs. In a press release about the new book, Watters reflected on how the original story was always a rumination on humanity’s relationship with Earth’s natural resources, and how he plans to revisit those themes through a contemporary lens.

ALEX PRAGER, PART ONE: THE MOUNTAIN (2022)

ALEX PRAGER, PART ONE: THE MOUNTAIN (2022)

DENIZ AKKAYA

A solo exhibition of new work by artist Alex Prager featuring elaborately staged scenes that capture a moment frozen in time.

Lehmann Maupin London presents Part One: The Mountain, an exhibition of new work by artist Alex Prager. Both a photographer and filmmaker, Prager is known for her elaborately staged scenes that capture a moment frozen in time, inviting the viewer to “complete the story” and speculate about its narrative context.

Prager cultivates an uncanny, dreamlike mood throughout her oeuvre—an effect heightened by her use of timeless costuming and richly saturated colors that recall technicolor films, as well as the mysterious or inexplicable happenings she often depicts. Her meticulously crafted photographs are filled with hyperreal details, from signatures on the cast of a high school football player or bandage on the nose of a woman running in terror, to the face in the reflection of a handheld mirror or figure revealed to be a cardboard cutout, firmly locating Prager’s images in the real world and belying the sense of the surreal that often pervades her work.

Although Prager’s immersive, large-scale photographs of crowds are among her best-known work the artist’s newest series evinces a return to portraiture, a genre she first explored early in her practice. Rendered on a smaller, more intimate scale that draws the viewer in, Part One: The Mountain features a series of stripped-down Americana portraits that capture the artist’s subjects in the midst of intense inner turmoil. The inspiration for Part One: The Mountain arose from Prager’s deep desire to examine the myriad emotional states we have all experienced during one of the greatest collective upheavals in modern society. Conceived as psychological portraits, these images visualize a private moment that is understood universally.

Prager’s subjects in Part One: The Mountain can be seen as archetypes, an update of sorts to those found in ancient Greek mythology. The series includes Prager’s quintessential characters, placed in a world that teeters between the fabricated and the familiar. Each image in the series occupies ambiguous territory, leaving space for the viewer to interpret each scene and draw their own conclusions about its narrative.

The title of the exhibition, Part One: The Mountain, is highly symbolic, with the idea of the mountain referenced throughout literature, religion, and psychology as a place where personal revelations, or reckonings, can occur. If the idea of summiting a peak has historically suggested a spiritual pilgrimage or intense physical challenge, it should be remembered that traversing mountainous terrain has often symbolized overcoming obstacles or making hard-won progress. If we have found ourselves metaphorically on the mountain over the course of the past two years, Prager’s newest body of work prompts us to imagine what the world will look like when we finally come back down.

The exhibition is supported by WePresent, WeTransfer’s digital arts platform.

On view from 21 January – 5 March, please note that this exhibition is closed on Sundays.

NUDE @ FOTOGRAFISKA

NUDE @ FOTOGRAFISKA

DENIZ AKKAYA

Featuring the work of 30 female artists from 20 different countries, NUDE is a collection of images that portray the body through beautiful, disruptive, and experimental lenses, seeking to subvert the historically predominant male gaze and celebrate the human form.


“Nudes” is an exhibition which is varied in itself as it contains the work of 30 different photographers from every corner of the world (Nigeria, Sweden, South Korea, Brazil, USA, Australia, etc.), with the common thread connecting them being the focus on the human body. Another connection, which makes this exhibition even more interesting and exciting, is that all 30 photographers are women! In other words, the exhibition is on the female perspective of the human body.

NUDE addresses the centuries-long fascination with the naked body, and explores the balance between “the nude” as an idealized form versus an honest, natural, and personal artistic expression. In this exhibition of over 200 works of photography, film, and installation, the viewer receives a comprehensive global view of what the body means, how it is used, and what it tells us about modern society from a female perspective.

“A celebration of the human form through the lens of female photographers”

– Amanda Hajjar & Johan Vikner, Exhibitions Organizers

NUDE opens at Fotografiska New York on February 11, and will be on view until May 1.

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